Whose Storm Is This?

Storm, in Marvel Future Fight
Storm, in Marvel Future Fight
Screenshot: Marvel Future Fight/Twitter

Storm is my favorite character from the X-Men lore. So, I never tolerate any disrespect of the baddest bitch in comics land.

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Cue this shit—a visual character profile of Storm quickly circulated the internet, in promotion of the upcoming Role-Playing Game (RPG), Marvel Future Fight.

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What in the colorstruck clusterfuck?! As writer-editor @ConStar24 aptly tweeted, “When they said Storm was an African superhero, they didn’t mean Charlize Theron.”

And thus, “Charlize Theron” became a trending topic on Twitter. In case you didn’t know (her Twitter name won’t let you forget), Theron was born in Benoni which is near Johannesburg, South Africa.

In case you need a refresher, here is why Storm shouldn’t fucking look like that, via the X-Men Fandome site:

Storm is the descendant of an ancient line of African priestesses all of whom have white hair, blue eyes, and the potential to wield magic. Her mother, N’Dare, was the princess of a tribe in Kenya. She married the American photojournalist David Munroe and moved with him to Manhattan, where Ororo was born. When Ororo was seven months old, she and her parents moved to Cairo, Egypt. At the age of five, during a bombing in an Arab-Israeli Conflict, a plane crashed into their home.

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In addition to the comics, the main Storm I recognize and acknowledge is the one in X-Men: The Animated Series. Of course, I am a huge fan of Halle Berry, but color (heh) me surprised when I realized she was cast as the powerful princess. That same light-skinned energy carried over into the film franchise’s prequel series when Alexandria Shipp was cast. Now more than ever, the desire for a dark-skinned Storm (finally!) in a major film or live-action television series is brolic. Names such as Michaela Coel (I May Destroy You), Dominique Jackson (Pose), Teyonah Parris (Candyman) and Yetide Badaki (American Gods) have entered the fan cast conversation, especially once it was known that the brand was finally scooped by Disney/Marvel (through the 20th Century Fox acquisition). Shipp didn’t handle the colorism critiques too well.

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Let’s get back to the game. Per the official website, the aim of the game is as follows:

YOU MUST GATHER THE MARVEL UNIVERSE’S MIGHTIEST SUPER HEROES AND VILLAINS, AND PREPARE FOR THE FINAL BATTLE TO SAVE OUR TIMELINE IN A GROUNDBREAKING NEW ACTION RPG: MARVEL FUTURE FIGHT!

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Harpo (and Marvel), who dis white woman?! This is the comic-book version of the “white woman dipped in chocolate” phenomenon that has plagued the professional modeling industry. This is the mutant version of the carbon copy white women wearing Black-ass T-shirts on merchandising websites. This ain’t Storm—this is Breeze, at best.

This ain’t it.

Staff Writer, Entertainment at The Root. Sugar, spice & everything rice. Equipped with the uncanny ability to make a Disney reference and a double entendre in the same sentence.

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DISCUSSION

laserface1242
Laserface1242

Plus, there’s shit like New Mutants. In which Sunspot, a character who is supposed to be Afro-Brazillian in the comics, is played by a white guy in the movie because the Director/co-writer didn’t care much about colorism and wanted someone who “looked rich”.