We Do Know, Do Show and Do Care What's New and Black on Netflix in November 2020

Boyz n the Hood (1991)
Boyz n the Hood (1991)
Photo: Columbia Pictures

Yeah, yeah, I know I’m a little late with this one, but there was this little thing called a weeklong presidential election happening last week. It took up a bit of my (and everyone’s attention) so it kind of slipped through the cracks. No big deal, though!

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While we’re un-hunching our stressed shoulders just a bit more now that we have a new president-elect named Joseph Robinette Biden Jr., it’s time for yet another round of Black-ass content from Netflix.

The month of November kicked off with quite a robust selection such as Boyz n the Hood (by the way, I feel like Doughboy would be side-eyeing Ice Cube right now because One-Term Trump certainly never knowed, showed or cared about Black folks in the hood), Jumping the Broom, School Daze, Chappelle’s Show, Two Can Play That Game and Woo.

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I know many Black people have expressed how difficult it was for them to watch Fruitvale Station (which chronicles the police killing of Oscar Grant) for understandable and valid reasons. Since that film debuted, we’ve had to endure several more police killings and it’s as if the trauma is neverending. For those who are ready to watch the film, it will be available on the streaming platform on Nov. 12. On that same tip, the 2017 documentary about the Ferguson uprisings, Whose Streets? will be heading to Netflix on Nov. 16.

Because the holidays are coming up, Netflix is debuting some of its original programming, including Jingle Jangle: A Christmas Journey on Nov. 13 and Dance Dreams: Hot Chocolate Nutcracker on Nov. 27 (stay tuned for video content from The Root surrounding those two projects, by the way!).

A couple of Christmas films are already streaming now, including Operation Christmas Drop and A New York Christmas Wedding.

You can check out the full Strong Black Lead November 2020 lineup below:

Staff Writer, Entertainment at The Root. Sugar, spice & everything rice. Equipped with the uncanny ability to make a Disney reference and a double entendre in the same sentence.

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