Trailer Roundup: Does Love in the Time of Corona Feel Like Jazz on a Summer's Day?

Love in the Time of Corona (2020) ; Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1959)
Love in the Time of Corona (2020) ; Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1959)
Screenshot: Freeform/YouTube, FilmBuff Movies/YouTube

This is the last week of July...hell, it’s the last day of July—can you believe it?! Time is a construct, blah blah blah. We are firmly in a place where most of 2020 is behind us...let that marinate. When you’re done allowing the seasoned thoughts to sit, let’s get into these trailers!

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Residue (Netflix; Release Date: Sept. 17, 2020)

Residue trailer / ARRAY (YouTube)

First Impressions: Here goes ARRAY scooping up even more Black excellence—it’s what they do. Speaking of excellence, Merawi Gerima directed, wrote, produced and edited this joint. This film follows filmmaker Jay (Obinna Nwachukwu) who returns to his hometown of Washington, D.C., only to have to grapple with the effects of gentrification. Relevant as hell, right? Yeah. This looks intriguing and I’m looking forward to being introduced to Gerima’s work (he’s the son of Sankofa filmmaker Haile Gerima and filmmaker/producer Shirikiana Aina) as well as Nwachukwu, who looks like a star just from the trailer.

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Seeing America (HBO; Release Date: Aug. 1, 2020, at 10 p.m.)

Seeing America teaser / HBO (YouTube)

First Impressions: We’ve already championed the allyship of soccer phenom Megan Rapinoe so that already covers half of my excitement to see this. The other half? The potential Black-ass guests, of course! In this teaser, we see Nikole Hannah-Jones (who is joined by Rep. Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez and Hasan Minhaj) and in true Rapinoe fashion, we’re getting gritty with the critical issues facing today’s society...in this country. It’s a pivotal time for this kind of stuff, y’all.

PBS KIDS Talk About: Race and Racism (PBS Kids; Release Date: Oct. 9, 2020)

PBS KIDS Talk About! / PBS (YouTube)

First Impressions: So, I’m cheating a bit here because this series has already premiered, but I wanted to highlight a particular upcoming episode. In the Black community, we’ve discussed having “The Talk” as a Black child’s rite of passage in regards to police interaction, but we also acknowledge that the overall talk of race and racism needs to happen across racial lines. With this episode, PBS Kids (a 24-hour channel) is making that happen. Make sure the kiddies in your life tune in (so y’all can discuss afterward)!

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Love in the Time of Corona (Freeform; Release Date: Aug. 22, 2020, at 8 p.m. ET/PT)

Love in the Time of Corona trailer / Freeform (YouTube)

First Impressions: We all pretty much called it. As soon as the coronavirus pandemic became mainstream news and our lives were regulated to lockdowns and social distancing, we knew film/TV writers would be typing furiously away at their laptops to whip up the next big corona-era project. Cue Freeform. This concept looks adorable as fuck and we get to see some Black Love with Leslie Odom Jr. (Hamilton), Nicolette Robinson (The Affair), L. Scott Caldwell (Lost) and more. Swoon! This will be a two-night event starting on Aug. 22 and continuing the next night on Aug. 23.

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Jazz on a Summer’s Day (Virtual Cinemas; Release Date: Aug. 12)

Jazz on a Summer’s Day / Kino Lorber (YouTube)

First Impressions: So, this isn’t exactly a new project (it’s from 1959), the trailer is new! It’s a re-release event (due to the 4K restoration)! As a Chicago native, I’m naturally raised by jazz so this one caught my eye. This is a documented recap of legendary photographer Bert Stern’s (who directed this doc) visit to the 1958 Newport Jazz Festival. We’re talking live performances by Louis Armstrong, Thelonious Monk, Chuck Berry, Dinah Washington, Mahalia Jackson, and more! Plus the stirring images of the music genre’s spirited fans. I’m tuning in!

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On the Trail: Inside the 2020 Primaries (HBO Max; Release Date: Aug. 6, 2020)

On the Trail trailer / HBO Max (YouTube)

First Impressions: This doc is in collaboration with CNN Films and highlighting primaries is especially important in this presidential election year. This film particularly follows the female reporters (including Video Producer Jasmine Wright) of the leading news network and showcases what it means to profile and document a high-profile campaign—particularly one that is unprecedented as 2020 (imagine having to be Trump’s correspondent, as a woman). “People can think what they want about me because I’m still gonna get the job done—and better than most of y’all,” Wright says toward the end of the trailer. Girl, yes!!!

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Potty Break (Digital Screening via Zoom; Release Date: Aug. 11, 2020, at 7 p.m. ET)

Potty Break trailer / Potty Break (YouTube)

First Impressions: Written by, directed by and starring British actress Donna Augustin, this web series explores the adventurous world into the public women’s bathroom. You know, the place where you make lifelong friends that you may never see again over drunken affirmations and tampon donations. This came across my slew of press releases (which is why I even have to do roundups like this—so much content!!!) and it definitely caught my eye. This looks hilarious. You can RSVP for the virtual screening here.

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Well, that’s all, folks! See y’all in August.


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Staff Writer, Entertainment at The Root. Sugar, spice & everything rice. Equipped with the uncanny ability to make a Disney reference and a double entendre in the same sentence.

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DISCUSSION

theblightofgrey
TheBlightOfGrey

Thanks for reminding me to go watch this re-release. Eric Dolphy, who likely died as a result of racism, is also featured. At the height of his career while in Europe he collapsed on stage and was rushed to a hospital. The doctor assumed Dolphy, a black musician, was a junkie and put him in a bed to recover. Dolphy had undiagnosed diabetes. He didn’t smoke, do drugs, or drink.