Natural-Hair Sensation, YouTube Star Meechy Monroe Dead at 32

MeechyMonroe via Instagram
MeechyMonroe via Instagram

Sad news for the natural-hair community and everyone else touched by her work: Meechy Monroe, who became well-known via her YouTube tutorials for natural hairstyles, died at the age of 32 at a nursing home in Westmont, Ill., on June 27.

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Her mother, Patricia Moore, told the New York Times that the cause of death was brain cancer.

Meechy’s natural-hair journey began in 2009 after a bad haircut prompted her to do the “big chop” and transition to natural hair. Like many of us, she went searching for information online and found her people in the burgeoning natural-hair movement.

In 2010 she posted her first YouTube video and introduced herself to the masses. The rest, as they say, is history.

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From twist-out tutorials to product reviews, Meechy’s videos grew a following, and with more than a million views on her YouTube channel, it wasn’t long before product endorsements came calling.

According to the Times, Meechy had multiple strokes in 2014, and during a surgery to repair brain damage caused by the strokes, a tumor was discovered and diagnosed as cancer.

The beautiful black queen known for her big mane of hair did not let cancer or the loss of her hair during chemotherapy keep her down; she began documenting her cancer journey, too.

In a 2015 interview with People magazine, Meechy said, “I lost all my hair, I had the worst year of my life, but you know what? I’m still the same person, still the same soul. I’ve learned not to take my health for granted and to live in the moment. I’m grateful for every second of living on this earth.”

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Our condolences to her family and loved ones.

News Editor for The Root. I said what I said. Period.

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DISCUSSION

bassguitarhero
bassguitarhero

My mom just died of cancer. Actually going to the viewing tomorrow, funeral on Wednesday. It’s not something you look forward to, but if there’s one plus side, you REALLY learn to appreciate the time you have left.

I got a bonus mid-year last year, and I sat on it so I could go visit her (she lived in UK, me in US) for Christmas and New Years, her birthday. They turned out to be the last ones we got to celebrate together, but year after year, they got more and more important.

She was in the hospital in April very sick, and I flew over again, and when my great uncle was dropping me off at the train station to head home, I told him, “Every time I see her, I have to treat it as if it could be the last.” You don’t leave anything on the table.

I called her every Sunday, and the last Sunday I talked to her, I told her I was getting a raise, but I didn’t know how much. She was looking forward to me calling her back and letting her know when she passed away on a Friday. Ir was that, but that was it. I didn’t get to tell her how much my raise was, but she knew I was doing well, we had just seen each other, she knew I loved her and vice versa, and that was it. We didn’t leave anything on the table.

I’ll leave with one of my favorite stories about her. Although I’m half black, she was this tiny little white english woman with a thick accent when she was living in America. After she lost her hair to chemotherapy, a lot of women often decide to wear wigs. She thought they were uncomfortable, so she just rocked what she had.

One day I drove out to take her grocery shopping, and she did it up. We got to the parking lot and headed into the store, and she was wearing a white leather jacket and, I shit you not, a white durag with the cape flying out. She was badass. We did our shopping, and while we were loading groceries back up, this woman came running out with a gift basket, told my mum that she worked for a cancer support group and wanted her to have this gift basket because she was such an inspiration. I’ll never forget that.

Anyways, life is short. Cancer taught me to cherish every moment I had with her, because the clock was so obviously ticking down. But it’s ticking down for everyone, and you just never know. Don’t leave anything on the table.