Image: Marvin Gaye in 1970. (Afro American Newspapers/Gado/Getty Images)

So, boom.

You just splurged on the biggest Chanel bag in the store. You decided to two-tone your Patek, having worn it around enough to finally decide what should be done with your luxury timepiece. You’ve got a bad little vibe who’s been on your mind, but your phone is elsewhere (we’re living in a post-smartphone dystopia?) and you’ve got to alert her to your intentions upon your return home. What do you do?

You send a letter, that’s what you do.

But you can’t just send any letter. You didn’t splurge on that bauble on your right wrist to be out here ending sentences with prepositions on regular-ass lined paper. The ghost of General Future (why can’t Future be in the story as a ghost?), valiant leader of Planet Earth’s army in the ongoing Space Jam, (which, through some sort of hilariously bad cultural diffusion, has become parlance for any intergalactic war, of which there have been many) didn’t give up lean to fit into his Gucci exoskeleton for that foolishness.

Lucky for you, your talented-ass black ancestors will have already provided your snail-mail with the proper stampage: The United States Postal Service’s Marvin Gaye stamp.

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Born in 1974, artist Kadir Nelson, has had his works included in the private collections of the International Olympic Committee, and the US House of Representatives, among other notable institutions. His work has graced the covers of New York Times bestsellers. And in 2019, his representation of Marvin Gaye will be available for your taxes and tirades alike.

Tap dance legend Gregory Hines will also be featured in USPS’s roster of new additions. Don’t dilute the drip in the future, my future guy.