Kate Upton; Michael Rapaport
Getty Images/Rommel Demano; Getty Images/Gilbert Carrasquillo

Sunday-afternoon football brought out all of the experts when it came to when and how to properly protest. Of course, these lessons in protests were mainly aimed at the black athletes protesting injustice by sitting out the national anthem, and, of course, they came from white people because white people know best when it comes to patriotism and telling black people what to do (they get it from their forefathers).

Players from the Miami Dolphins and Kansas City Chiefs cornerback Marcus Peters made political gestures either by kneeling during the anthem or even raising the "black power" fist. All the while, two celebrities in particular had an interesting Sunday on social media.

Model Kate Upton and actor Michael Rapaport apparently shared similar sentiments when it came to people respecting 9/11 and not protesting, and decided to give lessons in protesting. And then they learned really fast that no one wanted or asked for their opinions.

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Look at Miss Upton telling all the Negroes how to protest. But when she was asked a few important questions, of course she had nothing to say:

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And here's Rapaport. You may remember him from such classics as Higher Learning, in which he played a racist skinhead named Remy. Rapaport considers himself to be a "down-ass white boy," and a purveyor of all things hip-hop. But, of course, in typical "down-ass white boy" style, he isn't really that down when it comes to issues black people face. Rapaport actually threatened that he'd remove any player from his fantasy football team if that player protested during the national anthem. Because we all know that players care about who carries them on their fantasy football team.

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Rapaport then spent most of his Sunday evening unintelligently responding to people's tweets and name-calling, which is probably on par with his dismal acting career. It's funny how white people always want to advise black people on when, where and how to protest, but when it comes to the systemic injustices and the reasons black people are protesting, they have very little to say.