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Racial perpetrator Rachel Dolezal is reportedly unable to find work and lives off public assistance these days. Perhaps she’s now getting the downside of being black in America.*

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But the infamous cultural appropriator seems to be taking it all in stride.

“I’m not going to stoop and apologize and grovel and feel bad about it,” she told The Guardian. “I would just be going back to when I was little, and had to be what everybody else told me I should be —to make them happy.”

Dolezal told the outlet that she now relies on food stamps to feed her family, and next month she expects to be homeless.

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The former head of the NAACP in Washington state resigned in June 2015 when her white parents revealed that she was not black.

Over that brouhaha, the 39-year-old lost her job as an adjunct professor, and she claims thatshe hasn’t been able to find work since, though she did tell Vanity Fair that she braided hair on the side to make ends meet.

Dolezal says that she’s applied for more than 100 jobs but has gotten goose eggs on all of them. She also says that she has legally changed her names on all documents but is still recognized (and laughed at) wherever she goes.

She says that the only job offers she’s received are for reality television and porn. Her reported memoir is also said to be Kryptonite, and she says that she was turned down by 30 publishing houses. (She eventually found one to publish it.)

“The narrative was that I’d offended both communities in an unforgivable way, so anybody who gave me a dime would be contributing to wrong and oppression and bad things. To a liar and a fraud and a con,” she explained. “Right now the only place I feel understood and completely accepted is with my kids and my sister.”

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Yet and still, Dolezal says she’s never going back to the white side of town.

“No. This is still home to me,” Dolezal said. “I didn’t feel like I’m ever going to be hurt so much that I somehow leave who I am, because I’m me. It really is who I am. It’s not a choice.”

*Note: I’m in no way saying all or even most black folks in America are on food stamps ... just saying it’s hard out here as a black woman.

Read more at The Guardian.