Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson
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I don’t blame Ben Carson; you gotta do what you gotta do when it comes to getting votes. First he had his wife sing the national anthem, putting all meowing cats to shame. Then there are the stories about his early life that seem to be blown way out of proportion: There’s Ben Carson, the vigilante; there’s Ben Carson, the thug.

Well, before you can even blink an eye, Carson is once again giving people something to talk about.

Meet Ben Carson, music mogul.

In Carson’s newest radio ad, one can say he’s trying to reach a different demographic, but one can also say, “Stop.”

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Carson enlisted the help of Aspiring Mogul in the 60-second ad, which will air in two weeks in Miami, Atlanta, Houston and Detroit, as well as Birmingham, Ala.; Jackson, Miss.; Memphis, Tenn.; and Little Rock, Ark. Thankfully, I live in Virgina.

Wait, what about Iowa?

Carson also enlists the help of a third-grade flutophone player … well, no, he probably didn’t—but the ad’s soundtrack sure sounds like me in the third grade playing my flutophone.

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In the $150,000 ad, Carson lists some of his goals, and promises to make the world a better place.

“America became a great nation early on, not because it was flooded with politicians, but because it was flooded with people who understood the value of personal responsibility, hard work, innovation, and that’s what will get us on the right track now,” Carson says.

“I’m very hopeful that I’m not the only one that’s willing to pick up the baton to freedom,” he continues. "Because freedom is not free and we must fight for it every day. Every one of us must fight for us because we are fighting for our children and the next generation.”

We must also fight against rap beats made in 1991.

Carson’s campaign spokesman told ABC the purpose for his rap ad is to awaken the urban market.

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“Reaching them on a level they appreciate and follow, and see if we can attract their consciousness about the election,” the spokesman said. “They need to get involved and express their voice through their vote.”

Yeah, that’s all good and stuff. Sure, Carson wants to reach the “urban market,” but there are better ways to do that, and none of them includes contrived raps over dead hip-hop beats.

After all is said, I’ll never forget the medical strides Carson made in his medical career. I’ll just try to pretend like none of this other stuff ever happened. He’s black, so maybe it won’t even get put into the history books. My grandkids will only know of Dr. Ben Carson, the man who pioneered brain surgery.